Posted in Blogging

State of the Blog, Year 2

Two years ago, I hit the “Publish” button and began a blog. So naturally it’s time for a little self reflection on how things are going.

Continue reading “State of the Blog, Year 2”

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Posted in SQL Server, T-SQL Tuesday

T-SQL Tuesday #102 – Giving back little by little

Happy T-SQL Tuesday #102! The challenge for this month is from Riley Major (b|t). His challenge is to think about how we can give back to the community. (Check out his blog invite or the T-SQL Tuesday website to find out more details about this monthly blog party.)TSQL2SDAY-150x150

The list of suggestions that Riley put together is quite an impressive one. It’s a great reminder that there are so many ways to get involved in the community.

I’ve started doing several things on the list over the past year – speaking, taking on the T-SQL Tuesday challenges, getting involved with the local user group – so I’m definitely going to commit myself to doing more of that. Maybe I can “up my game” and submit to a SQL Saturday in a city that I have to fly to or even submit a session to present for a virtual user group or a bigger event like GroupBy or 24 Hours of PASS.

At my new job, I’ve been told there are opportunities to do “lunch and learns” and I’ve been told to encourage my co-workers to join me at the local user group meetings. It’s kind of a no-brainer to do those.

But of all the things on the list, I definitely would love to find a way to pay forward the support I’ve gotten from members of the community to others who need it. A few people have come to me asking for advice or to be sounding board. As happy as I am to help out, I still feel like there’s more that I could do in this area. One concrete thing I think I can do is volunteer to help the first timers at PASS Summit as part of Buddy Program, if they continue that program again this year. But I’m going to keep looking to find other opportunities to help support others as they need it and in general feel like I’m being a better citizen of our #sqlfamily. I know they’re out there, but I just need to find the way that I can contribute.

As I was putting this list together, I realized that these examples are little things that I can do. And that’s OK that they’re little things. I think that’s important thing to note for those who are thinking about how they can start to give back to the community. One of the great things that Riley’s original list proves is that not every way to give back to the community requires big gestures. If you’re not someone who’s comfortable stepping into the limelight or jumping in with both feet (or whatever other catchphrase fits), there are still a lot of behind the scenes ways to contribute. There is a place in this community for that special passion you have and this community wants you to share with us.

Thanks to Riley for hosting this month’s topic! And thanks to all those who are currently doing so much to support our community and those are going to take on the challenge to step up their involvement! And if there is something I can do to help out, please let me know….

 

Posted in SQL Server

Insert Title

Hello LabelI was talking with some people after a user group meeting and over the course of conversation, I was asked what I do. I said my official job title was Senior Database Architect. It then turned to why my blog is called “Deb the DBA” if I’m a database architect. Perhaps “Data by Deb” would be a better name? It’s not the first time the “DBA” part of the blog title has gotten attention. But all of this definitely got me thinking…

As I write this post, my title is no longer a Senior Database Architect. I’m about to start a new job with the title of Senior Database Developer. My title the last time I switched jobs was Senior Database Administrator. Continue reading “Insert Title”

Posted in SQL Server, T-SQL Tuesday

T-SQL Tuesday #100 – Looking ahead

TSQL2SDAY-150x150It’s T-SQL Tuesday. But it’s not your ordinary, normal T-SQL Tuesday – it’s the 100th T-SQL Tuesday, which is a pretty significant milestone. This month, our host is the creator of this monthly blog party, Adam Machanic (b|t). Adam, thank you for introducing something that has inspired the community for so long.

Our challenge this month is to think about what the world would be like for T-SQL Tuesday #200. I can barely predict what’s going to happen in the next 10 days and I definitely don’t have the insight of “The Simpsons” writers, but I thought I’d give this a try – in terms of databases at least.

Continue reading “T-SQL Tuesday #100 – Looking ahead”

Posted in WIT

Thoughts for International Women’s Day 2018

It’s International Women’s Day. I wrote about this topic last year and looking back, I think what I said stays true. I was worried when I wrote it that I was being too positive and glossing over some of the problems that still exist. But that’s who I am – someone who always takes the optimistic point of view. (Cue Monty Python…)

Continue reading “Thoughts for International Women’s Day 2018”

Posted in T-SQL Tuesday

T-SQL Tuesday #99 – My #sqlibrium

TSQL2SDAY-150x150It’s another T-SQL Tuesday. Thanks to Aaron Bertrand (b|t) for hosting this month. (If you want more information about T-SQL Tuesdays in general, read more here.)

Aaron gave us a choice this month – we can either talk about how we keep our #sqlibrium (i.e. work\life balance) or we can talk about some of our own personal additions to his bad habits list. I’m choosing Door #1.

The easiest way to my #sqlibrium is by the extra facts I add about me at the bottom of my “About Me” slide for my presentations:

random facts 2

You’ll notice a theme – music.

If my love for theater, especially musical theater, isn’t apparent, may I direct you to my T-SQL Tuesday post from August about “Auditioning for the Job?” I’ve always loved theater. I was in a sketch comedy troupe in college so I was able to use that to get some acting in. I always thought I’d have the opportunity to do community theater once I graduated college but that never seemed to materialize, other than the one production of Annie where I was a bum or dancing through the streets of NYC or a maid in the Warbucks household. But I still love theater even if I can’t be on stage. About that picture from the slide on the right – yes, it’s me with the one and only Bernadette Peters after seeing her and Elaine Stritch in Stephen Sondheim’s A Little Night Music on Broadway. (Yes, I “stalked” the stage door hoping for this and yes, I got her to sign my playbill as well.) My friends and I have subscriptions to the touring Broadway shows and I have done the subscription to one of the local theaters that had been sending its shows to Broadway. Seeing Waitress before it went to Broadway with the majority of original Broadway cast is still a highlight.

(While it’s not musical theater, seeing James Earl Jones and Dana Delany be fantastic and still be outshined by a revelatory Amanda Plummer in Night of the Iguana by Tennessee Williams was pretty fine evening, too.)

The bluegrass jams and instruments are relatively new. I’ve been doing those for about 4 years now. I picked up guitar about 2 1/2 years ago and the mandolin was a gift over the holidays. I know of at least 4-5 different local jams that occur each week with at least one more monthly jam. I can’t make all of them but I try to get to one or two on a weekly basis. And then there are a whole bunch of different festivals that where you can hear bands or just walk up to a group and start jamming (or picking as it’s called in the bluegrass world.) You wouldn’t think it would have such a strong following in New England, but there’s a huge community in this area. It’s wonderful to show up and just make music. I’ve lucked out in finding a group of really talented people who’ve made the process of jumping and in learning all these new songs and styles so much fun.

Finally, on most Tuesdays, my response to most things is:

https://some.ly/165u2VQ/

In many ways, my choir is my second family. As my director said, we’re not the family we were born into but the family he auditioned. I joined this group a year after I graduated college. In terms of repertoire, it’s incredibly diverse – ranging from Baroque music from the early 1600s through new commissions to everything in between. We’ve sung songs in over 15 languages and toured internationally. We even have a documentary from our tour to Eastern Europe that was shown on PBS stations. The picture on the left in my slide is me in our version of the Andrew Sisters singing Ba Mir Bistu Shein; we do this as part of an arrangement that starts the original Yiddish theater version. I wouldn’t be half the singer I am today if it weren’t for this group – from our conductor\artistic director who is so passionate about what we do to the vocal coaches we’ve had through the years to the other fabulous singers who have become such good friends of mine. Perhaps the best way I can describe this group to #sqlfamily is to call it #choirfamily.

When I’m having a rough day or week, showing up and making music with good people seems to make everything else go away. Speaking of which, I should wrap this up – I have rehearsal and solo auditions tonight! Wish me luck!

 

Posted in SQL Server

I Know Nothing – Execution Plan Edition

Just call me Jon Snow, because like him, I know nothing.

giphy

Or at least, that’s how I feel. In many ways, I feel like a light has gone on over my head. Recently, I’ve been looking something that I’ve been working with for a long time and I feel like I’m really able to understand it.

I’m talking about execution plans. I use them all the time. But lately, I feel like I’ve not been using them correctly at all. I always try to go to as many different sessions that cover execution plans to make sure I know how to read them properly. Despite my best efforts, I’m not sure where I went wrong. But I feel like I should share where I’m starting to get things right.

Continue reading “I Know Nothing – Execution Plan Edition”